New Pattern Release: Vestiges of Winter

Vestiges of Winter was designed while watching the snow fall, hoping winter was finally on its way out and spring is just around the corner.

Designed to be a quick and easy knit, this toque was made with handspun in mind, but works equally well with commercial yarns. It can be knit in a few hours, and is perfect for gift and charity work, or to use up partial balls of colour you have left over from other projects.

Using Fair Isle knitting, this hat is an easy introduction to this technique for knitters looking to branch out and experiment.

Check out the pattern page here, and head on over to Ravelry here.

I’m pleased as punch to offer this pattern for free until midnight on April 4th (MST).

Pattern Release: Clovis Point Shawl

I’m very pleased to announce my newest release, the Clovis Point!

This is a top-down shawl, with instructions for two sizes (and easily adjusted to fit your desired measurement). Using a selection of cables, lace, and textured stitches, it provides interest while knitting, and creates a harmonious piece that can become an every day staple in your wardrobe. Pick one all over colour, or pick two, using the textured border as a highlight to the main body (the above images show it in Cascade 220 Sport in the Straw and Ginseng colourways).

I took my inspiration for this design from the forms of Clovis projectile points – slender fluted points that were used as spear and dart heads, dating to as early as approximately 13,200 years ago. Named after the city where they were first discovered – Clovis, New Mexico – these have actually been found as far south as Venezuela and all the way north into Alberta.

One of the things I love about archaeology is that you can see, in tangible form, the history of ideas taking shape and spreading. Often when I tell people that while I was in university that I had a particular interest in trade routes of North America, you can actually see eyes begin to glaze over.

But it’s not just stuff that gets moved around, it’s the ideas that come with it. Clovis projectile points are an excellent example – you can actually see a new method and technology begin, and through tracing where that technology ends up, you can see what culture connect with other cultures, and the ideas spread.

A Clovis projectile point isn’t just a spear head, it’s our shared history of learning and of our movement (physically and metaphorically) as a species, and that I find infinitely inspirational.

Click here to go to the pattern page or here to go to the Ravelry page, where you’ll find more info on sizes, yardage, and materials needed.

To celebrate it’s release, if you purchase the pattern anytime from now until February 12th (midnight MST) you automatically get 15% at check out (no coupon code required).

New Pattern Release: Cèilidh Infinity Scarf

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I’m pleased to announce the release of my newest pattern, and companion to the Cèilidh Fingerless Gloves – the Cèilidh Infinity Scarf.

When I was creating this I really wanted the cèilidh cable to be the highlight, but I wanted to add some structure to the piece as well. I live in pretty cold parts of Canada, and in Alberta the winters can be long and harsh, so I wanted something I could wear that would really protect me against the chill in the coming months.

The trellis cable flanking each side of the main cable added that structure that I was looking for. Not entirely for the faint of heart, this pattern has cabling on every single row – right side and wrong side. If you’re a lover of cables (like me!) you’ll rise to the challenge! The lovely thing about this particular trellis cable is that it’s easy to read on the wrong side, and after the first few four-row repeats of the trellis you won’t even have to look at the chart.

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As always, members of my newsletter will find a special coupon code in their inboxes, so check those emails. If you’d like to receive future updates and specials available only to my newsletter subscribers, be sure to sign up using the handy form to your right.

New Pattern Release: Cèilidh Fingerless Gloves

Ceilidh Fingerless Gloves

I’m very happy to announce the release of my newest pattern, Cèilidh Fingerless Gloves!

I’ve actually had this pattern, and another to be released soon, on the drawing board for a while. It all started with me playing around with what would eventually be this cable. I wanted something that gently curved and twisted, inspired by the dancers at a cèilidh.

Traditionally, a cèilidh in Scotland and Ireland was any kind of social gathering that brought together everybody from the community. Stories were told, food was eaten, and dances were held. Modern usage of the word places the emphasis heavily on the dancing, where groups come together in formal and informal settings to dance in groups. Then and now, however, it’s about bringing people together in the community, and this cable was inspired by that.

The gloves are the first of two patterns I designed to highlight this cable – the second will be coming out in the first week of November, so stay tuned for future announcements!

As always, my newsletter subscribers receive a special discount code to use, so if you’d like to receive these in the future, be sure to sign up for my newsletter via the form to the right hand side of this page.

New Pattern: Dappled Shade

Dappled Shade Knitting Pattern

Dappled Shade is now live!



I live for spring and summer. Despite my love of warm comfy cables (which are just not conducive to wearing when it’s 30C outside), spring and summer are really my time to shine. I am outside in my large veggie patch every day (an average of 40 different types of tomatoes is not out of the norm for me), digging in the dirt, watching the bees do their thing, and watching the wind move my plants around, creating constantly changing shapes in the shadows.

I named this pattern dappled shade because it has that strong link to my garden for me – the light falling through the lace incorporated into this pattern very much remind me of those dancing shadows I find in my garden.

It’s knit on the bias, with two different lace stitches, along with a smaller eyelet panel, all of which create varying shapes and forms the whole length down this shawl or scarf.

I for one plan on wearing it as much as I can through the fall and winter to keep me connected to that deep feeling of calm I find in my garden, and having it remind me that soon this winter will pass, and I will be out there again.

You can see more about the pattern here, or view the Ravelry page here where it is available for purchase.


Did you visit Lael & Larry of Hearthside Fibers at the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival? If you did, pull out the card you got from their booth and receive 30% off the pattern price upon checkout!