New Pattern Release: Vestiges of Winter

Vestiges of Winter was designed while watching the snow fall, hoping winter was finally on its way out and spring is just around the corner.

Designed to be a quick and easy knit, this toque was made with handspun in mind, but works equally well with commercial yarns. It can be knit in a few hours, and is perfect for gift and charity work, or to use up partial balls of colour you have left over from other projects.

Using Fair Isle knitting, this hat is an easy introduction to this technique for knitters looking to branch out and experiment.

Check out the pattern page here, and head on over to Ravelry here.

I’m pleased as punch to offer this pattern for free until midnight on April 4th (MST).

Pattern Release: Clovis Point Shawl

I’m very pleased to announce my newest release, the Clovis Point!

This is a top-down shawl, with instructions for two sizes (and easily adjusted to fit your desired measurement). Using a selection of cables, lace, and textured stitches, it provides interest while knitting, and creates a harmonious piece that can become an every day staple in your wardrobe. Pick one all over colour, or pick two, using the textured border as a highlight to the main body (the above images show it in Cascade 220 Sport in the Straw and Ginseng colourways).

I took my inspiration for this design from the forms of Clovis projectile points – slender fluted points that were used as spear and dart heads, dating to as early as approximately 13,200 years ago. Named after the city where they were first discovered – Clovis, New Mexico – these have actually been found as far south as Venezuela and all the way north into Alberta.

One of the things I love about archaeology is that you can see, in tangible form, the history of ideas taking shape and spreading. Often when I tell people that while I was in university that I had a particular interest in trade routes of North America, you can actually see eyes begin to glaze over.

But it’s not just stuff that gets moved around, it’s the ideas that come with it. Clovis projectile points are an excellent example – you can actually see a new method and technology begin, and through tracing where that technology ends up, you can see what culture connect with other cultures, and the ideas spread.

A Clovis projectile point isn’t just a spear head, it’s our shared history of learning and of our movement (physically and metaphorically) as a species, and that I find infinitely inspirational.

Click here to go to the pattern page or here to go to the Ravelry page, where you’ll find more info on sizes, yardage, and materials needed.

To celebrate it’s release, if you purchase the pattern anytime from now until February 12th (midnight MST) you automatically get 15% at check out (no coupon code required).

On Breaks & Fresh Perspectives

What a crazy past few weeks!

Although much late, I do wish to say I hope everybody had a lovely holiday season. Mine was busy (but good), and the past few weeks I’ve been down for the count with various minor ailments that have been taking up far too much of my time an energy – capped off by a wicked head cold that completely thwarted all my attempts to knit (damnit).

I am very happy, however, that in December (and a bit into January) I decided to take a few weeks off from designing and instead, focused on knitting some other designer’s patterns.

The first, and my official entry into the 2016 Indie Designer Gift-A-Long was the Stranger Things Cowl by Mary Annarella. I love this thing! It’s so lovely and warm, and the design is incredibly fun. I knit it with Drops Alpaca, which is a little fuzzy for a stranded pattern, but the feel of it is heavenly. It’s so much fun to wear, and fans of the show immediately get it.

I ended up using 225 yds of the light grey and 206 yds of the dark grey. Why 20 yards less when both sides are exactly the same? Who knows, it’s one of those mysteries.

The second project I made up was Ella Austin’s Leighton House Handwarmers. Again, I used a slightly fuzzier alpaca – I really have to stop doing that for extremely fine stranded patterns. But the siren call of soft warm alpaca is something I can’t beat. However, when I knit this pattern again (which I will), I will go with a yarn that affords a bit more stitch definition, so I can really do this design its justice.

What I loved most about this pattern (besides just how plain beautiful it is), is although it’s extremely finely detailed, the repeats are very easy to remember. For the yarn I used Scheepjes Alpaca Rhythm in three colours: the light blue (cuff and Latvian braids) I used approximately 26 yards, for the dark blue on the hand I used about 61 yards, and for the whitish main colour I used 96 yards – leaving more than half the balls. I could easily knit up another pair without purchasing any more yarn!

So as you can see, I’ve been on a bit of a stranded kick lately.

But that doesn’t mean I haven’t been working on my own patterns. After a few weeks break I came back looking at a few projects fresh, which is exactly what they needed, and jotted down ideas for a few more. I even came up with a long-form multi-release project, which is something I’ve been wanting to do for a while but couldn’t quite nail down exactly what I wanted to do.

Sometimes mini-breaks are all you need to clear the cobwebs out. Gives you a fresh perspective on something that otherwise you’re starting to run circles around.

Indie Design GAL: Socks Part 2

This is part of my on-going Indie Designer Gift-A-Long 2016 series, where from November 23rd – December 31st I highlight some patterns from my fellow designers also participating in the event! Each post will highlight at minimum 5 different designers and their patterns.

Don’t forget to join in the fun, we’re all over here chatting up a storm (when our fingers aren’t flying that is).


Fright Night by Lara Smoot

From the pattern description
What do you do when your next door neighbor is a Vampire? Well in the case of a knitting pattern designer, you design socks with a Vampire theme and hope for the best! These socks were inspired by one of my all time favorite Halloween movies, Fright Night and my love for Vampire horror movies in general.

Available in M and L, uses approximately 530 – 570 yds fingering weight yarn.

Gertrude Bell by Virginia Sattler-Reimer

From the pattern description
Inspired by the fantastic book: Gertrude Bell, Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations. I used the gorgeous color Glazed Pecan for these socks, thinking of desert sands and camels and the adventures of Gertrude Bell!

Available in one size, uses approximately 350 – 420 yds fingering weight yarn

No Parking by Alison Ziegler Designs

From the pattern description
No Parking! is an easy stranded sock pattern with an all over, mirror-image graphic design and a no-wrap short row heel. The all over diagonal patterning on these cuff down socks allows for lots of creativity on your part.

Available in S, M, L, uses approximately 250 – 400 yds of fingering weight yarn

Short Circuit by Jo Torr

From the pattern description
This is a fun, toe-up pattern in a stranded design, suitable for both men and women. The instructions for the construction of the socks are all written, the colourwork pattern is only charted.

Available in S, M, L, uses approximately 450 yds of fingering weight yarn

Paths Crossing Socks by Karen Buhr

From the pattern description
This is a fun top-down cabled sock pattern. It is good for adventurous beginners and advanced knitters who are familiar with sock construction and knitting in the round.

Available in S and L, uses approximately 380 – 500 yds of fingering weight yarn

Indie Design GAL: Socks Part 1

This is part of my on-going Indie Designer Gift-A-Long 2016 series, where from November 23rd – December 31st I highlight some patterns from my fellow designers also participating in the event! Each post will highlight at minimum 5 different designers and their patterns.

Don’t forget to join in the fun, we’re all over here chatting up a storm (when our fingers aren’t flying that is).


Couplet by Bonnie Sennott

From the pattern description
Couplet is a top down, “his and hers” sock pattern, with instructions for two sizes and two options: one with lace at the calf and one without lace. Stitch patterns are provided in both written form and charts.

Available in medium and large, uses approximately 365 – 400 yds of fingering weight yarn

Changeful by Hunter Hammersen

From the pattern description
Sometimes something is too much fun to just do once! That was the case for the lovely stitch on these socks. It looks smashing worked as an all over pattern, but it also lends itself to both a more sedate rib and to something a bit fancier.

Available in four sizes, uses approximately 300 – 425 yds of fingering weight yarn

Byerly Socks by Mary E Rose

From the pattern description
The Byerly Sock was designed to be a tasteful entry into stranded colorwork. Using less than 10 yards per band of contrast colors,this cuff down sock can be customized to use those oddments of yarn you have left over from other projects. Use one, two or more contrasting colors to make the sock uniquely your own.

Available in S/M and M/L, uses approximately 380 – 420 yds of fingering weight yarn

Avalon by Allison O’Mahony

From the pattern description
The Avalon Peninsula of the island of Newfoundland is a place where rugged terrain meets unforgiving weather, making wool socks a wardrobe staple year round. Classic colours and a generous cuff add interest to these ribbed boot socks which are fine enough to fit into lightweight hiking boots, but also warm enough for winter.

Available in four sizes, uses approximately 306 – 557 yds of fingering weight yarn

Drunken Sailor Socks by Emily Wood

From the pattern description
The cabled socks are knit from the top down with a heel flap and gusset. Right and left socks are mirror images of each other. Both written instructions and charts are included for the detailed sections of the pattern.

Available in four sizes, uses approximately 350 – 425 yds of fingering weight yarn