New Pattern Release: Trochu

I’m very excited to announce my newest pattern – Trochu!

Trochu is a cabled toque, knit from the bottom up, and named after a small town in Central Alberta, Canada. Knit in a light worsted weight yarn and using a smaller needle gauge, this toque creates a denser fabric, protecting against the cold wind that barrels down the Rocky Mountains and whistles across the Canadian prairies in winter.

This toque is designed to be either worn as a slouch, or with a rolled brim for a more traditional toque, and comes with both charted and written instructions.

Check out the pattern page here and the Ravelry page here.

And don’t forget to check out the faux fur pom pom tutorial on the blog right here, so you can finish your toque off with one.

Tutorial: How To Make A Faux Fur Pom Pom

If you’re like me, you love knitting toques (or beanies/knit caps to my non-Canadian friends). My latest pattern, Trochu utilizes a hand made faux fur pom pom to finish it off, and they’re a great way to add a bit of personality.

Faux fur pom poms are an awesome alternative to a more traditional yarn pom pom, and are quick and easy to make, with materials you probably already have laying around the house. These can be whipped together in a few minutes, and for less than a few dollars.

Materials:
· Faux Fur
· Utility knife
· Pen
· Thread or yarn
· Glass (or anything with a circle you can trace)
· Polyfill, scrap wool, scrap yarn (or anything you can stuff into your pom pom!)
· Cutting mat, or cardboard

The faux fur fabric might be the only thing you don’t have sitting around at home. This stuff is really easy to find at any fabric store, and often there is a huge variety available, so you’re sure to find the colour and texture you will like. Be sure to ask the cutter what the smallest amount of fabric you can get is – at my fabric store it’s 10 cm, and even with that I have enough faux fur to last me a life time of pom poms. A 10 cm x 114 cm strip of fabric (4″ by 45″) cost me a grand total of $2.49.

Step 1

Gather your materials together. If you have a cutting mat, I’d recommend using one, but if you don’t, a few sheets of cardboard will protect the surface you’re working on. Take your glass (or anything with a circle you can trace around), and place it on the underside of your faux fur. The glass pictured about is about 9 cm (3.5″) in diameter. Take your pen and trace the circle (don’t worry about it showing, it won’t).

Step 2

Take your utility knife (make sure it has a good sharp edge), and cut around the circle.

Step 3

Take your thread, and sew a loose baste stitch around the circumference. I use Gutermann Jeans Thread, which is nice and tough. You’ll be pulling somewhat hard on the thread to close the pom pom, so thin, weak thread isn’t recommended. If you don’t have Gutermann Jeans Thread (but you should, it’s great for so much!), you can use yarn from the toque you just knit, or a thinner yarn you have laying around the house.

Step 4

Now pull on the thread and synch that puppy tight, leaving about a 2 cm (0.75″) hole.

Take your polyfill, yarn scraps, or wool scraps, and stuff it into the small hole.

After you’ve completed that, pull on the thread/yarn/whathaveyou more to close up the hole as much as possible.

Step 5

Leave a tail of thread/yarn so that you can sew your pom pom to your toque.

Tie a small knot to secure the thread from coming loose, and you’re done! Now you have an awesome faux fur pom pom to attach to your toque.

Happy New Year!

A quick note and a very Happy New Year to all of you (and yours).

Many people take the new year as a time of reflection and a time to set goals for the next twelve months. I’m a big believer in doing now what can be done now, so I don’t really set myself big overarching life-goals for the next year. Instead, what I do is think about my past year in terms of creating knitting patterns, and create a yearly “to-do” list. It helps order my thoughts and lets me figure out what I want to accomplish in terms of creative crafting.

This year, one of my to-dos, is to spin for designing more. Late in 2016 is when I really got back into spinning after a very long break, and now that I have a healthy sized stash of handspun, and have gotten more comfortable spinning purposefully, this is something I really want to go at hard for 2018.

2018 for me will also be all about keeping to a schedule – a release schedule for patterns, specifically. When I started designing a few years ago and up until the end of 2017, I kind of released a pattern whenever. This resulted in radio silence for several months, followed by a flurry of releases. I’m not totally happy with that, so for 2018 expect a bit more of a regular occurrence with my pattern releases.

Which is an excellent segue (love a good segue!), for a little sneak peak of my newest pattern, Trochu, coming out this month.

I’ve had a really awesome round of testers for this knit, and I can’t wait to share this pattern with you. The name comes from a small town in Alberta, about two hours south of me. We have particularly cold, windy winters in the prairies of Alberta, and this knit is designed to help keep you warm.

Stay tuned, the pattern will be releasing in about a week!

Indie Design GAL: Home

This is part of my on-going Indie Designer Gift-A-Long 2017 series. Starting November 21st I am highlighting some patterns from my fellow designers also participating in the event! Each post will showcase 5-6 different designers and their patterns.

Don’t forget to join in the fun, we’re all over here chatting up a storm (when our fingers aren’t flying that is).


Fancy Hen by Ella Austin

From the pattern description:
Fancy Hen makes a cheerful addition to the home. The colourwork design is inspired by patterned ceramic tiles and the flower motif is similar to traditional fairisle designs.

Uses approximately 528 yds of DK weight yarn.
 
 
 
 

Christmas Stockings by Faye Kennington

From the pattern description:
With 24 colourwork charts to mix and match, this pattern offers 512 different possible options for customizing your own stocking. And that’s even before you take colour combinations into account! The stockings are worked toe-up with a solid colour toe and a stranded foot.

Uses approximately 220 yds of worsted weight yarn.
 
 

Sea Oak by Kate Bostwick

From the pattern description:
This decorative throw pillow cover features a cable motif down one side of the front and simple stockinette everywhere else. The pillow is worked flat, in one piece. The bottom of the back is worked first in stockinette stitch, followed by the cabled front and finally the top of the back in stockinette again.

Uses approximately 500 yds of worsted weight yarn.
 
 

Firth Waves Cushion by Jessie McKitrick

From the pattern description:
Evoking the natural rhythm of a “firth”, an inlet or bay, the fair isle pattern employed by this cushion will relax and impress anyone who views it. Knit in a palette of gorgeous blues, a pop of an alternate color is knitted with a third strand, or added later by duplicate stitch.

Uses approximately 1210 yds of worsted weight yarn.
 
 

Framed Cables Baby Blanket by Helen Gipson

From the pattern description:
The all-over twisty twirly travelling cable design is as pretty as a picture framed between simple borders. Much easier and intuitive to knit than it looks, this blanket will make a much cherished gift.

Uses approximately 530-700 yds of aran weight yarn
 
 


A note: I take care to not highlight the same pattern as previous years, so do be sure to check out the GAL 2016 series of posts. Many of those will also be eligible this year for the GAL.

Indie Design GAL: Shawls Part 2

This is part of my on-going Indie Designer Gift-A-Long 2017 series. Starting November 21st I am highlighting some patterns from my fellow designers also participating in the event! Each post will showcase 5-6 different designers and their patterns.

Don’t forget to join in the fun, we’re all over here chatting up a storm (when our fingers aren’t flying that is).


Leah Shawl by Frauke Neubauer

From the pattern description
The Leah shawl has the shape of a stretched half-moon. It’s worked from the middle to the lower edge, with both sides being shaped through increases.

Available in two sizes, and uses approximately 570-760yds of fingering weight yarn.
 
 

Tenia by Pariser Landluft

From the pattern description
Tenia is a triangle shawl that knits up quite fast. It starts with a plain stockinette section which transform through interrupted garter stitch into a garter stitch border.

Available in one size, and uses approximately 689 yds of DK weight yarn.
 
 

Mustard and Slate by Susanne Visch

From the pattern description
Mustard and Slate is the shawl to knit when you just don’t want to choose… Simple or lace? Gray or Oker? Using two colors, Mustard and Slate has a simple textured body and a delightful lace edging.

Available in one size, and uses approximately 656-711 yds of fingering weight yarn.
 
 

Minarets and Lace by Mary-Anne Mace

From the pattern description
This top-down crescent shaped shawl is a celebration of my favourite Estonian stitches. The stitch motifs include nupps, lace flowers, gathered stitches and arguably the prettiest motif of them all – the lily of the valley.

Available in one size, and uses approximately 662-684 yds of lace weight yarn.
 
 

Shawlands by Susanna Winter

From the pattern description
Shawlands was inspired by my love of black tea, and is named after a tea variety from the Shawlands Estate in Ceylon. It is hearty, robust, comforting, and warming — like snuggling inside on a chilly autumn’s day with a cup of tea and a good book.

Available in one size, and uses approximately 782 yds of DK weight yarn.


A note: I take care to not highlight the same pattern as previous years, so do be sure to check out the GAL 2016 series of posts. Many of those will also be eligible this year for the GAL.